Krauthammer on Obama, Ayers, Rezko and Wright

Alex Chediak:

Charles Krauthammer, with usual wit and verve, explains why Tony Rezko, Bill Ayers, and Jeremiah Wright are legitimate issues for Barack Obama.

Why are these associations important? Do I think Obama is as corrupt as Rezko? Or shares Wright’s angry racism or Ayers’ unreconstructed 1960s radicalism?No. But that does not make these associations irrelevant. They tell us two important things about Obama.

First, his cynicism and ruthlessness. He found these men useful, and use them he did. Would you attend a church whose pastor was spreading racial animosity from the pulpit? Would you even shake hands with — let alone serve on two boards with — an unrepentant terrorist, whether he bombed U.S. military installations or abortion clinics?

Most Americans would not, on the grounds of sheer indecency. Yet Obama did, if not out of conviction then out of expediency. He was a young man on the make, an unknown outsider working his way into Chicago politics. He played the game with everyone, without qualms and with obvious success.

Obama is not the first politician to rise through a corrupt political machine. But he is one of the rare few to then have the audacity to present himself as a transcendent healer, hovering above and bringing redemption to the “old politics” — of the kind he had enthusiastically embraced in Chicago in the service of his own ambition.

Second, and even more disturbing than the cynicism, is the window these associations give on Obama’s core beliefs. He doesn’t share Rev. Wright’s poisonous views of race nor Ayers’ views, past and present, about the evil that is American society. But Obama clearly did not consider these views beyond the pale. For many years he swam easily and without protest in that fetid pond.

Read the whole thing.

Alex Chediak finishes off his post with an interesting question, saying,

Incidentally, in Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance, Obama recounts Jeremiah Wright’s sermon on the day he first visited the church. It included statements like “white folks’ greed runs a world in need.” Can you imagine McCain’s political chances if he had spent twenty years in the church of a pastor with white supremacist leanings?

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